Conversation Questions about Movies

Students love talking about their favorite and least favorite movies. Describing movie plots is never easy, but is a great way to work on improving fluency. And because movies often have different names in different languages, part of the challenge is trying to figure out which movie your classmates are describing. 

Anyway, today I have a list of movie-themed conversation questions to get your students  chatting. If you’d like to print out the list, there’s a link to a printable handout at the bottom of the page. Enjoy!

Conversation Questions About Movies

  1. What are your favorite types of movies?
  2. What is the last movie you watched? What was it about?
  3. What is your favorite movie from your childhood?
  4. What is your favorite teen movie?
  5. Do you remember the first time you went to a movie theater? How old were you? What movie did you see?
  6. Did you often go to the movie theater with friends when you were a teenager?
  7. Do you prefer to watch movies at home or in a movie theater? Why?
  8. What is your favorite movie snack?
  9. Do you prefer to watch movies alone, with friends, or with your family?
  10. Do you usually talk while you watch movies, or are you quiet?
  11. What movie do you really hate? Why do you hate it?
  12. Do you have a favorite movie?
  13. Do you ever cry when you watch movies? Which movies made you cry?
  14. How do American movies compare to movies from your country?
  15. Do you like documentaries? Describe an interesting documentary that you saw.
  16. Do you like animation? What is your favorite animated movie?
  17. Do you like silent movies? Do you like Charlie Chaplin?
  18. What are your favorite holiday movies?
  19. Do you read reviews before you watch a movie? Do you usually agree with the movie critics?
  20. Do you watch award shows? Why or why not?

Handouts:

I’ve typed these questions up into a printable worksheet that you can hand out to your students right here:  Questions About Movies

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Quirky Story: Sausages for Lunch

Today, I’ve got a super-adorable storyfor you about a couple of lost dogs who really like their Sunday routine. It’s written in the simple present tense, can be used with elementary, and lower intermediate classes, and is appropriate for students of all ages.

I’ve included a handy, printable handout at the bottom of the page so that you  easily share it with your students.

Sausages for Lunch

Liz and Graham Hampson love their dogs Charlie and Theo. They are a happy family. They take walks together every day. The Hampsons make barbecued sausages every Sunday. Then the family eats lunch together. Charlie and Theo love barbecued sausages!

One day the Hampsons take their dogs for a walk in the hills near their home. The dogs run ahead into the forest. It is a foggy day, and soon Liz and Graham cannot see their dogs.
“CHARLIE! THEO!” they call, but the dogs do not come back. They are lost.

The Hampsons are very sad. They call their friends and family for help. More than 120 people come to search for the dogs. They search the forest for four days. Nobody can find the dogs.

Then they have an idea. They bring a barbecue grill to the forest. They cook sausages and wait. Finally, they hear a bark. It is Charlie! Theo is right behind him. They smell the sausages, and they are ready for lunch.

Conversation Questions:

1. Do you have pets? What kinds of pets do you have?
What are their names? What do they look like?

2. Some people say that their pets are their children. Is it possible for pets to be part of a family? Why or why not?

3. Are you a dog person or a cat person? Why?

4. What types of animals are good pets? What types or animals are not good pets?

5. What are some ways to find a lost dog or cat?

Suggested Vocabulary:

  • take walks
  • sausages
  • hills
  • foggy
  • forest
  • lost
  • grill
  • search
  • find
  • wait
  • bark
  • ahead
  • behind

Yay! Handouts!

Click here to download a PDF printable handout of the story that you can share with your students: Sausages for Lunch

This ESL news story was based on a true story. You can read the actual story here, and share it with your more advanced classes: Lost Dogs Return Home for Breakfast

Take a look at this page for ideas on how to use my quirky news stories with your classes: Quirky News Stories

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